New role for Professor Susan Morton

Prof Susan Morton

Growing Up in New Zealand’s long-time research director, Professor Susan Morton, is taking on a new role as Foundation Director of the study. 

Growing Up in New Zealand’s long-time research director, Professor Susan Morton, is taking on a new role as Foundation Director of the study. 

Professor Morton has spearheaded Growing Up in New Zealand since it began and has developed an international reputation as a leader in longitudinal research. 

Her dedication to the study; expertise in longitudinal study design and implementation; her many research outputs; and her commitment to the participants of the study have seen her recognised with a New Zealand Order of Merit in 2019. 

Susan will now provide oversight, advice and expertise to the study as a Foundation Director.  

This new role harnesses her invaluable experience and means she will have more time to make use of the valuable information provided by the children and families since before they were born.  

She will continue as the Director of the University of Auckland’s Centre for Longitudinal Research and lead the Our Generation, Our Voices, Our Future study. This additional Growing Up project which is funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment aims to explore new ways of connecting with the cohort as they transition into their teenage years.  

Susan says she’s excited about the opportunities afforded by her new role. 

“I am pleased to be able to continue to serve the Growing Up in New Zealand study and team in this new role.  I am excited about the opportunities that come with this new position and look forward to continuing to grow and develop the precious taonga that is Growing Up in New Zealand,” she says. 

Boyd will be taking on the Director role. He has an international reputation as a public health researcher and has experience working on longitudinal studies. 

He says it’s an honour to be chosen to guide Growing Up in New Zealand through its day-to-day operations and into a new phase of the study as the children reach the milestone of adolescence. 

“It’s an exciting time to be joining Growing Up in New Zealand as the team prepares to reconnect with the children when they hit 12-years of age. 

“I’m grateful to be able to draw on Professor Morton’s considerable experience and expertise and I’m looking forward to consolidating and developing the research that comes out of Growing Up in New Zealand,” he says.  

“It’s an incredibly valuable and important study which has the potential to drive so many vital and important changes to benefit New Zealand children and whānau.”  

To learn more about Susan Morton’s fascinating career, read this.  You can find out more about Boyd Swinburn here.